Johns


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American photographer Josh Johnson (b. 1980) captures the not-so-glamorous spot in life that everyone visits at least once a day: the toilet. We sit down or remain standing, do what’s needed and flush away what’s left behind. This curious fascination started three years ago and “has everything to do with everyone being far more primitive and equal than we’d like to admit,” as Johnson says. “I wonder how some people can think so highly of themselves and go through such a humbling daily ritual.”

This humorous series is mostly shot from above and cut in crazy angles due to the tight spaces. It’s almost like you’re entering the room yourself. Shot in bright light, no details are spared from exposure, resulting in honest portraits of intimate and occasionally filthy spaces. Whether we see scented candles, a vase of sunflowers and kitschy Art Deco tiles, an airport toilet or a heavily graffitied punk space, it’s clear that a restroom cuts across cultures. Custom, habit and convenience all have an influence on society’s notion of this humble household room.


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