Obsessive Becoming


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To me, the photograph starts as a recording of light. It doesn’t matter if the final outcome is made of pixels, grains or pure data. - Carson Lynn

When you look at American photographer Carson Lynn’s series Obsessive Becoming with this statement in mind, his photographic universe opens up for you.

Seeing virtual reality as an experience so lifelike that it will make reality appear increasingly fake, Lynn started to analyse and dissect the landscape through a digital lens. But unlike many photographers who use the landscape as the basis for their work, Lynn’s environments seem to be taken out of a video game, making the viewer question if what they’re seeing really exists or if it’s been created by the artist.

With landscapes that are photographed as if they were game backdrops, using mountains and curves made up out of digital lines and shapes and by appropriating topographic maps from the U.S. Geological Survey - it’s clear to see that Lynn uses every tool at his disposal to deconstruct and reinvent reality.

Lynn photographs objects and textures as though they existed within a virtual space: not as three-dimensional solid objects, but two-dimensional surfaces warped in a three-dimensional space. Through this method, his monochromatic images evoke feelings of transcendental planets and digital worlds, and proves that photography cannot be defined with a single, simple outcome.

To enhance the physicality of his photographs, Obsessive Becoming has also been published a book by the artist. It is available to purchase on the artist’s website for $15.


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